Health & Wellness

Cataracts in Old Dogs Eyes

The good news is that cataracts in old dogs’ eyes, when caught early enough, may be treated. The bad news is, if you leave it too long, then the opportunity to repair the blurred vision passes.  However, cataracts are so common in old dogs that there’s an entire website dedicated to  Cataracts in Dogs which provides solid information for those who need more information.

 Cataracts in Old Dogs Eyes

 “Generally speaking, there are three types of cataract in dogs: incipient cataract, immature cataract, and mature cataract. Incipient cataract is the mildest case of this disease. This type rarely interferes with the dog’s vision. Here, the opacity of the lenses is so slight that it is hard to determine if your dog is suffering from the disease or not.

Immature cataract is more severe. This type causes blurred vision and it will be observable in your pet. If just a portion of the eyes is cloudy, it’s called immature cataract.

However, if it covers the entire part of your dog’s eye, then the disease has progressed into mature cataract.

The three types of cataract can also be referred to as the stages of the disease. If you see that your dog is suffering from any of these, see the veterinarian right away. The disease can still be cured during its early stages. Otherwise, it might be a little hard for the vet to reverse the effects of the disease.

There are several reasons why dog cataract develops. But even so, they all occur in the same way. The disease gradually affects dogs, regardless of their gender, age, or breed. Your dog is prone to the disease as much as your neighbor’s is. Unfortunately, there’s no vaccine for a cataract. It can only be treated the moment it develops.

Dog cataract may decrease the wellness of your pet. Dogs suffering from this disease will not be able to live their lives fully. Dogs need their vision as much as humans do. A dog’s abilities are lowered the moment it acquires this disease. Its level of usefulness decreases as well, especially if it is being used as a guard dog, a police dog, or as a dog companion.”

Nuclear sclerosis is a condition that is often times mistaken for cataracts in old dogs’ eyesClick here to learn the difference between the two and how you can help your loyal companion in either case.  Do you have experience with cataracts in your senior dog? What were some of the warning signs and how did you care for your dog?

 

 

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. the fat loss factor

    Aug 3, 2013 at 2:41 pm

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