Choosing a Breed

Choosing the Best Breed For You

Have you given much thought to what is really the best breed of dog for you and your lifestyle, temperament, and living situation? Most people do not. They do as we all do when deciding on adding a dog to the family—we look at a few different puppies, and one steals our hearts is the pup we walk in the front door with. Sometimes we have chosen wisely and other times we have made a huge mistake. Let’s take a look at how to decide what the best breed of dog for you most likely is.

There are many considerations to take into account when deciding what is the best breed of dog for you and your family. Think back to other dogs you have owned and how well you and the dog bonded. Stay away from those previous breeds you did not really get along with. Not all breeds fit everyone, so eliminate the ones you know are not your “type” of dog. Is a dog with aloof outlook what you seek? Or maybe a more laid-back dog that is playful, and gets along well with people will suit you better. How about a breed with high intelligence, so obedience training goes smoothly? These are important questions to ask yourself so you have a “real” relationship with the dog, benefiting the dog and you.

Are you into spending time every day grooming the dog or would a low-maintenance dog be better? What is going to be your ability to exercise the dog daily as certain breeds need, or are you not able to provide this due to age or a disability? And how much room do you have for the dog to live in? If you live in a small home with a very small yard it makes little sense to buy a breed who will weigh over 150 pounds when fully grown. Last thing to consider is if you are financially able to care for a dog. The expense of purchasing a puppy is going to pale in comparison to the costs incurred over the lifetime of owning and caring for the dog so be realistic when answering this question.

After considering the above questions go online and do a bit of research covering the selected breeds you are interested in. This way the best breed of dog for you will eventually surface and after buying the pup you will have a happy life together.

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6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. LEE

    Sep 6, 2013 at 5:55 pm

    I HAVE Chihuahuas in my home. Outside we have a pit what a gal, a hound, kick back and a small hairy dog all well loved. We give chi pups away for gifts but are very strict. I tell folks INDOOR DOGS. Lots of Love and mischief. Never know what size a chi will be so don’t buy cause its mother or father are small, pups from same litter can be totally different. When you get a dog or pup be ready to love it even when its bad (ours are very mischivies) and they will share your bed with you. its all about giving and getting love no matter what breed you get

  2. Connie DeWitt

    Sep 6, 2013 at 2:15 pm

    Be aware that your purchased puppy mare have originated from a horrible puppy mill, not a cheerful Mom and Pop home setting or a reputable breeder. If you can’t meet the parents of your pup, don’t buy. ADOPT. There are thousands of dogs waiting for forever homes, some from purebred rescues. Do the right thing, rescue or adopt.

  3. Rob

    Sep 6, 2013 at 8:58 am

    I have always had mixed breed mutts, they are smart and loyal. Any dog will look perfect when it’s yours. If you’re worried what your dog looks like, you should take a closer look at yourself, you may have issues. And if you go with a pit bull, most home owners insurance won’t cover you, owners won’t rent to you and you’ll be stuck with a dangerous uninsured dog.

    • Blaine

      Sep 6, 2013 at 10:18 am

      Dangerous dog? Didn’t Obama just recently make a statement against breed specific legislation? If you have a “dangerous dog”, maybe that’s another reason to “take a closer look at yourself”.

    • Karen

      Sep 6, 2013 at 12:50 pm

      Every pitbull I’ve ever met has been sweet and friendly, however a friend of mine was laying on her bed reading a book and her cocker spaniel jumped up and attacked her. It took over 100 stitches to put her face back together. Don’t generalize, not all pits are dangerous any more than all humans are smart!!

    • Vicki

      Sep 6, 2013 at 7:24 pm

      dear, there are no bad pit bulls, only bad pit bull owners.

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