Improve Your Senior Dog’s Life

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Senior dogs have only a few more years or months to live, so it is our duty as the owner to make sure that they live a happy, peaceful, and healthy life through their golden years.  As much as you try to improve your senior dog’s life there is only so much we can do as they age. Many older dogs suffer from a number of health and mental problems, enough to sometimes annoy or cause problems amongst their owners. These problems range from memory loss, night pacing, disturbance in sleep time, confusion or getting disoriented with things, excessive panting, house training and obedience problems and, wandering off. Although these issues normally come on slowly over time they will begin to show, especially when your dog gets older and a lot more confused. In fact, some owners do not realize such symptoms until they reach the point of being critical and sometimes life-threatening.

Improve Your Senior Dog’s Life

Old Timer!

About one-third of all dogs aged 11 years old, and almost all 16 year old dogs experience most of these mental, social, health and physical disorders. According to most studies conducted for these aged dogs, their brain seems to have deposits of amyloidal protein. The amyloidal protein is also found in senior humans who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, a disease of frequent memory loss and confusion. The dogs may have also a low level of dopamine in their brains (dopamine acts as a neurotransmitter of information from the senses to the brain), which may also cause cognitive dysfunction among our four-legged friends.

You can improve your senior dog’s life with many safe and common ways of treating cognitive dysfunction among our senior canine friends. Treatments range from regular and natural medications, herbal remedies, adjustments to the environment that they live in, and making changes to their daily meals and diet.

A common medicine used in treating cognitive dysfunction among dogs is Anipryl (L-Deprenyl). Its function is to help dopamine remain longer in the brain and decreases the free radicals in your dog’s brain. Nearly three-fourths of all dogs have improved using this medication, and as soon as your dog starts showing symptoms, it should be administered for a better effect.

Traditional and natural remedies work to improve your senior dog’s life, and many people tend are using homeopathic remedies and natural treatments, such as most Chinese herbal recipes and therapies. Acupuncture and homeopathy is also known to cure and improve your senior dog’s life and health.

You can also try a couple of food supplements for your dog, especially those that
are rich in Omega 3 fatty acids. Select only quality supplements full of vitamins and minerals that can benefit your aged dog is very helpful, but be sure that it is authentic, natural and has little or no harmful chemicals and preservatives, especially due to the fact your dog’s immune system is not as strong as when he was in his younger years.

Another thing you can do to improve your senior dog’s life is with social activities like walking, playing and even grooming your dog.

How do you help your elderly dog? Comments and any advice you wish to share is welcome in the space below.

3 COMMENTS

  1. My 14 year old dog shows many symptoms listed in your article that I did not realize were likely related to what we have been calling her senility. I’ll talk to her vet about the medication. As for how we have been coping, we still try to get her to walk a little each day and mostly have extra patience when she can’t seem to remember how to go through doorways and other things you just take for granted. I did not realize the night pacing and panting were a part of this but I will stop worrying about it now and just try to settle her back down to sleep when this happens. Thanks for the great article.

  2. I use to take my 13 yr. old Chow mix for walks with me 3 times a week. She loved it! She walked about 9 miles a week. That is more than most people. She died a year ago this past December. I sure do miss her. I’ve since adopted two wonderful dogs from the local shelter. I told the gal I wanted “the unadoptable.” I’ve had my new babies for a little over a year now. A 5 yr. old Husky mix and a 3 yr. old Boxer/Pit mix. They love their walks too!

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