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Is Your Yard Safe for Your Dog? Watch Out for These Common Toxic Plants

Christmas Cactus and Clematis VineHouseplants generally serve a number of favorable functions. They not only give visual interest to our home, but also serve as air purifiers. They may even be edible and medicinal. However, it’s crucial for a responsible pet parents like you to be mindful of the kind of houseplants in your home and garden since some of them can be toxic for your dog.

Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera

This popular succulent plant is a very useful herb for humans. As a matter of fact, it can serve as a soothing lotion for burns. While the gel found in aloe vera leaves is alright for your pooch, the outer leaves, however, contain saponins which can cause nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and tremors.

Apple & Cherry Trees

Apple & Cherry Trees

Many parts of these two common trees are said to be poisonous to dogs. The leaves, stems, and seeds of apples have cyanide which can cause breathing difficulties, panting, dilated pupils, and shock. Their fruit, on the other hand, can be a great snack for your healthy pooch.

Asparagus Fern

Asparagus Fern

This houseplant is often found in hanging baskets inside of homes. Asparagus ferns are toxic plants that contain sapogenins which can trigger allergic dermatitis. Once the plant grows berries, ingestion of them can result in diarrhea, abdominal pain, vomiting, and nausea.

Azaleas and Rhododendrun

Azalaeas and Rhododendrons

These pretty flowering shrubs contain grayantoxin which can affect a dog’s nerve and muscle function; thereby, causing depression, colic, dizziness, diarrhea, loss of appetite, excessive drooling, leg paralysis, weakness, and slowed heart function.

Christmas Cactus and Clematis Vine

Christmas Cactus and Clematis Vine

Ingesting the flowers, leaves, or branches of Christmas cactus can bring about depression, bloody diarrhea, and vomiting. Clematis vines, on the other hand, contain protoanemonin which is an irritant that can set off diarrhea, vomiting, and excessive drool in dogs.

Privet Hedge

Privet Hedge

This plant’s needles and branches have terpenoid glycoside which is a toxin that can produce intestinal upset, racing heart, and loss of balance and coordination in your pooch.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus

Oil in eucalyptus can trigger depression, excessive drooling, diarrhea, vomiting, and lethargy.

Garlic

Garlic

Another common but toxic houseplant is garlic. It’s a vegetable garden plant that contains N-propyl disulphide which is a poison that can bring about deterioration of red blood cells, blood in urine, panting, lethargy, and rapid heartbeat.

Hosta and Rhubarb

Hosta and Rhubarb

While Hosta contains saponins that can result in diarrhea, vomiting, and depression, Rhubarb leaves and its uncooked roots, on the other hand, have soluble calcium oxalate which can trigger tremors, kidney failure, and excessive drool in your pet.

Red Maple Trees

Red Maple Trees

If your dog ingests its leaves, symptoms of red maple poisoning can include change in urine color, abdominal pain, darkened membrane in the eyes and mouth, lack of appetite, inflamed paw, and lethargy.

 

While these 10 plants top the list for being the most toxic for dogs, there are hundreds of other common plants that could potentially harm your pet. Some other poisonous house and garden plants and trees you might recognize include: Amaryllis and many other varieties of lilies, several varieties of Holly, other fruit trees, like peach, apricot, and plum, Norfolk Pine, Baby’s Breath, Birds of Paradise, Begonias, Carnation, Chrysanthemum, Corn Plant, several varieties of palms, Daffodils, Daisies, varieties of Ivy, Hyacinth, Gardenia, Geranium, Gladiola, citrus trees, like lemon, lime, and grapefruit, Morning Glory, Mums, Oleander, and many, many more.

For a printable list of plants known to be toxic to dogs, click here.

If you believe your dog has ingested any poisonous plants, the Animal Poison Control Center is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year as a resource for any animal poison-related emergency. If you think that your pet may have ingested a potentially poisonous substance, call (888) 426-4435 for guidance, or visit your nearest veterinarian or animal hospital.

6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Helen

    Jan 2, 2016 at 9:37 pm

    Re the badly (lazy) typed comment on Clematis: I suggest the article’s author has done her homework, as have all those directly involved in the care and health of animals. I suspect that the commenter’s dogs have not bothered to ingest any part of her Clematis which is why they have not popped off the mortal coil!

    In short – a very silly, badly typed, and uneducated comment.

  2. Couch

    Jun 6, 2014 at 8:25 am

    christmas cactus causes depression. . . . wow xD

  3. Christy

    Jun 5, 2014 at 1:51 pm

    Can I not put aloe on my dog’s skin? I can’t get her to stop army crawling all the time and this summer, she seems to end up with little srapes on her tummy now and then. My husband and I treat our scrapes with aloe. I’ve used it on Madison a couple of times. Should I not do that?Will it hurt her? Btw, she is a 11 – the vet says a healthy and impressive 11, but still a senior dog. Is it a risk to try it?

    • Sam

      Jun 5, 2014 at 2:46 pm

      The article says the gel is not harmful, only the other parts.

  4. Ninz

    Mar 31, 2014 at 9:51 am

    Really impressive post and at the correct time too. I was looking for such kind of information. Actually I have a pug and I want a money plant in my home. Will it impose any impact on my pug??

  5. carrie

    Mar 20, 2014 at 6:00 pm

    this is crazy n not true abt clematis my last 2 dogs were grown up around my clematis in my back garden n nothing happen to them they pass away at a ripe full old age n i luv these creepers on my garden wall.

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