Bringing a New Puppy Into Your Old Dog’s Home

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Many people who are faced with losing their old pal opt to bring a new puppy home to ease the sorrow they know they’ll feel at the passing of their older dog. If you’re planning to do that, here are a few tips, courtesy of Old Dog Care Guide to make the old dog and new puppy meet each other.

1. Pick a neutral location to introduce them to each other.
Picking a neutral location makes things easier for the new puppy and your old dog. This way your old dog is less likely to see the new puppy as an intruder. For a location to be considered neutral, it must be someplace your old dog isn’t familiar with.

2. Encourage positive behavior.
When the two dogs begin to sniff each other—the normal form of greeting in the canine world—address them in a friendly, happy tone. Avoid using a threatening tone during this meet-and-greet. Make sure the dogs don’t go sniffing at each other for too long as this could result to aggressive behavior.

3. Assign each dog their own space, giving preferential treatment to the older dog.
It’s best to place the dogs in separate areas first. You don’t want your old dog to get the impression that he needs to guard his usual spot now that a newcomer is around. Feed the dogs at the same time but at separate places. You can place them in separate rooms if you need to.

Allot a sufficient amount of time for the new puppy and the old dog to get together several times daily. Remember, though, that these romping periods should be supervised, particularly during the first week. It takes time for these dogs to develop a bond with each other. Make playtime easier for both of your furry friends by letting them play in a large, well-spaced area. While toys may sound like a good idea, it’s best to do away with them at the moment since they can trigger aggression between the two dogs.

Be sure to continue to give the old dog the same love and attention you offered him before the puppy came in the home and you should have a harmonious home in no time.


  1. Maybe in some situations, but I found that It wasn’t a good idea for me. I have a 14 yr. old maltese & brought my nieces 6 month shit tzu over. The baby chased and chewed on poor Deenie. I did supervise, but it was a bit too much. This morning she is very tired & lethargic. Deenie is happy being an only dog in the house.

  2. I have a three year old female shitzu and just yesterday acquired a 12 week female shitzu. I would welcome any advice as my three year old is veey unsure.

  3. I think that a lot of people don’t consider the neutral ground concept. Even the most non-aggressive dogs can feel threatened by a newcomer stepping into their claimed area. I’ve learned the hard way by taking my dog to friend’s houses without prior introductions. The park or anywhere of that nature seems to work wonders for two new dogs meeting.

  4. I’m not an expert. I’m just a dog owner who has raised four puppies in succession. I brought my current dog into my home as a six week old puppy. At the time, I already had a 13 year old dog. I wish I had known about having them meet in a neutral location, but the first meeting went surprisingly well. In order to minimize any aggression over toys, I bought them both several new toys. Even though the puppy stole the older dogs toys at every opportunity, it did help that each of them had toys that didn’t, at least at first, smell like another dog. Ultimately, the older dog did get used to the puppy and was a great help in training him. The puppy was housebroken at four months and has grown into a wonderful dog, thanks to the older dog, who has since passed on.

  5. I have a 14 year old male black lab and just got a 8 week old male black lab, I read to do away with the toys at first but my 8 week old is teething bad and needs them but they do bicker over the bones, they want what the other has, what shold I do?