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Meet the Newest Employees of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Puggle and Huckleberry

This week, staff at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital welcomed their two newest colleagues, who walked through the doors on four furry legs. Huckleberry, a Golden Doodle, and Puggle, a Golden Retriever, are the newest hires of the Child Life department as part of a newly launched St. Jude Paws at Play facility dog program.

As the newest St. Jude employees, Puggle (left) and Huckleberry received their ID badges during orientation. They are accompanied in this photograph by their respective primary handlers, Child Life specialists Brittany Reed and Shandra Taylor.

“At St. Jude, we work to ensure patients and their families have the best experience possible while at the hospital,” said Downing. “The Paws at Play dogs will help children by offering therapeutic support, giving unconditional acceptance and providing motivation through social interaction. The program is a natural fit with our philosophy of making every day the best day possible.”

This is the first time St. Jude has participated in service dog programming in the hospital. Because St. Jude patients often have weakened immune systems, departments teamed to create new policies for the program. Among their workday duties, the dogs will help patients achieve clinical goals as well as provide social interaction, stress reduction and sensory stimulation.

The dogs join nineteen full-time child life specialists working at St. Jude. The departmental goal of Child Life is to help children cope with the challenges of health care and hospitalization. Their services are offered to all families in all clinical areas.

St. Jude Child Life specialists Shandra Taylor (left) and Brittany Reed will be the primary handlers for Huckleberry, a Golden Doodle, and Puggle, a Golden Retriever. The St. Jude Paws at Play hospital dogs will assist in distracting pediatric patients from their illness, symptoms, pain and anxiety. They will also motivate and support patients through social interaction.

“I am most excited to see the powerful effect that a dog will have on our patients,” said child life specialist Brittany Reed.  “We hope to provide emotional support and do things like motivating children to get out of bed and walk after surgeries or helping to prepare patients for surgeries by helping with non-sedated scans.”

Based on interactions and needs, the hospital dogs will see an average of four to six patients a day, with plenty of rest breaks in between.

Huckleberry and Puggle were trained by Canine Assistants, an Atlanta-based nonprofit that has trained service dogs since 1991 and has placed dogs in hospitals for more than 10 years. The dogs were specially matched with their St. Jude Child Life handlers.

“Canine Assistants trains these dogs from the time they are eight weeks old to be placed in hospitals,” said Child Life program director Shawn Brasher. “Their training is a bond-based approach, which recognizes the importance of a secure attachment as the most effective way to ensure goals of safety, effectiveness and well-being of the dogs.”

Puggle and Huckleberry will have lots of bonds at St. Jude, and especially with their handlers. When Puggle and Huckleberry are not at work, they live at their primary handlers’ houses, relaxing and playing with other members of the family.

The work day of Huckleberry and Puggle will be featured on Instagram: @stjudepaws.

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is leading the way the world understands, treats and cures childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases. It is the only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center devoted solely to children. Treatments developed at St. Jude have helped push the overall childhood cancer survival rate from 20 percent to 80 percent since the hospital opened more than 50 years ago. St. Jude freely shares the breakthroughs it makes, and every child saved at St. Jude means doctors and scientists worldwide can use that knowledge to save thousands more children. Families never receive a bill from St. Jude for treatment, travel, housing and food—because all a family should worry about is helping their child live. To learn more, visit stjude.org or follow St. Jude on social media at @stjuderesearch.

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. rick

    Sep 21, 2019 at 3:39 pm

    Looking back, there were a couple of dogs at my mother in laws rest home. The dogs were very well mannered and very happy. This is a marvelous idea

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